How to Draw a Tsunami, Tsunami, Tsunamis

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STEP 1. The first thing we need to do is sketch out the foamy part of the tsunami's wave. This should be done slowly so you can get a nice looking view. Basically just sketch out a long line of curls in a stream and detail those curls.   STEP 2. Next, begin sketching out the raised stem of the wave. These waves can form to be over two hundred feet high, now that's amazing, mother nature at work.   STEP 3. Continue on by making light long slightly curved brush or pencil strokes until you have a stream of hair like lines that seem to disappear at the end.   STEP 4. Next, sketch out some small waves at the base of the tsunami waves, then add texture detailing to those too.   STEP 5. We will sketch in the small clouds for the cloudy sky.   STEP 6. Lastly, sketch out or draw the small palm trees in the distance. Actually, it's the palm trees that are close to the viewer. The waves are so big, they overpower the size the trees.   STEP 7. For the shading part of this tutorial, you'll be needing to use 3 varied graphite softnesses in order to accomplish the deep shadows of the waves. A 9B is the softest, and easiest pencil to use to quickly sketch down sheets of shadows. The 6B is great to use for mid tones. The 4B is excellent for laying down foundation shadows.   STEP 8. This is an example of the stroke of shading and how it looks as it transforms from a very light stroke, to a very dark, and bold stroke. Use this technique within your sketches, the art will eventually pop depending on how skillfully you use hatching and where you place shadows.   STEP 9. First, let's start with the misty part of the wave. This is going to be the lightest part of the wave since it is misty, ruptured water. First, shade with the 4B pencil a base plane of shadow. Don't shade to dark, you don't want really dark misty waves. Once you've done that, take your tortillion/tissue and blend in the graphite strokes. With an eraser, erase away regions of highlights that will fluff up the wave, adding volume and texture.   STEP 10. Next, time to sketch in shadows for the clouds. I sketched several strokes with a 4B and 6B pencil for this part. Once I've accomplished dark shadows, I once again, took a blender and smudged in the graphite strokes to soften them up. Afterwards, I went ahead and took an eraser and erased highlights.   STEP 11. Then, taking my 6B and 9B pencils, I go ahead and sketch in dark strokes of shadows for the base of the wave, and leaving light shadows for the top. The reason the base is so dark, is because of the deepness of the water. This area has to be fairly dark in order to seem to have depth. Once again, take the blending material, and blend in the shadows. After a few repeats, you should have dark tones. Take whiteout, or white acrylics, and paint in very faint lines to detail a bit of mist on the wave. You must use a very thin paintbrush or thin material for this part.   STEP 12. Then, shading a nice shallow layer of shades for the sand, take the whitout and paint over the clashing mist of the wave. No tsunami wave is ever complete without the mist below. Once you're done, you should have something similar to this. I hope you've enjoy this tut, guys! Comment and let me know what I should do next in this sketchy style!   Step 1. Step 2. Step 3. Step 4. Step 5. Step 6. Step 7. Step 8. Step 9. Step 10. Step 11. Step 12.